Dyslexia – Asset or Disability?

Photo Credit: MaryAGrim@KatyISD.org

 

A loving, persistent parent as advocate is the dyslexic child’s best ally. He doesn’t have to end up on the scrap heap of humanity.

According to Gabrielle Coppola, “The ability to grasp the big picture, persistence, and creativity are a few of the entrepreneurial traits of many dyslexics.” They make exceptional entrepreneurs and inventors, among other accomplishments. Dr. Sally Shaywitz, a professor of learning development at Yale University, has long argued that dyslexia should be evaluated as an asset, not just a handicap. She co-founded the Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity, and is dedicated to studying the link between the two. “I want people to wish they were dyslexic,” she says. “There are many positive attributes that can’t be taught that people are generally not aware of. We always write about how we’re losing human capital—dyslexics are not able to achieve their potential because they’ve had to go around the system.”

Julie Logan, a professor of entrepreneurship at the Cass Business School in London, found that more than a third of the entrepreneurs she surveyed – 35% – identified themselves as dyslexic. The study concluded that dyslexics were more likely than non-dyslexics to delegate authority and to excel in oral communication and problem solving and were twice as likely to own two or more businesses. It appeared that many of the coping skills dyslexics learn in their formative years become best practices for the successful entrepreneur.

Check out this brief video on Successful entrepreneurs with dyslexia on NBC Nightly News.

In my experience I have found that most times, all they need to propel them to greatness is one person who believes in them.

What strengths have you found in the dyslexics you know?

Florence is the mother of an amazing teenager; an educational consultant, author, speaker, speech-language pathologist, encourager and perpetual optimist. She shares tips, tools and resources with mothers (and other caregivers) of struggling and/or failing children. She is fiercely committed to helping them develop and enhance their children's foundational skills for learning, to grow them to success in school and life. A believer in the unique learning abilities of all children, she is an advocate for those who learn differently.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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